May 2017
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India’s B-schools: Growth in Quantity, Not Quality

ICTpost Education Bureau

Only one Indian business school featured in a recent global ranking list that ranked 100 international business schools worldwide. The Indian Institute of Management in Ahmedabad was ranked 60th in the list compiled by the Economist, slipping 12 spots from last year and 21 places from its 2013 ranking. India’s tiny Asian neighbors Singapore and Hong Kong each had three schools in the top 100.

The study by MeritTrac-MBAUniverse suggests that the quality of education at many Indian B-schools falls short of recruiters’ standards. The survey, which looked at the marks secured by 2,264 MBAs who sat for tests administered by recruiting companies, found that only 21 per cent made the grade.
A boom in India’s management education sector that saw the number of business schools triple to almost 4,000 over the last five years has ended as students find expensive courses are no guarantee of a well-paid job in a slowing economy.

The allure of so-called B-schools outside the top tier is fading with the financial sector especially sluggish, and amid questions about the quality of some schools

The allure of so-called B-schools outside the top tier is fading with the financial sector especially sluggish, and amid questions about the quality of some schools

Private Education Challenges
Private education is big business in India. KPMG pegs the industry at nearly $50 billion and projects it to reach $115 billion by 2018. But growth rates are not uniform across the primary, secondary and tertiary education sectors.
The allure of so-called B-schools outside the top tier is fading with the financial sector especially sluggish, and amid questions about the quality of some schools.

Those who entered this industry with a motive to make money are leaving because there is not much money left. Every college is working to sustain itself. There was a near four-fold rise to more than 352,000 MBA course spots in the five years to March 2012.

B-Schools charge a wide range of fees. Look for an institute that charges a reasonable sum – say Rs. 5 to 7 lakhs for the entire two-year course.  You will find that B-Schools attached to Universities often offer good value for money. The fees are usually reasonable and the overall offering, worthwhile. Look out for opportunities to join such institutes and make the extra effort needed to get selected. What is the real business of business schools, especially the critical stakeholders in the school, that is, students and faculty? The tragedy is that B-Schools have got relegated to the role of placement agencies and all students and faculty are partners in the demise of the larger reason for the existence of a B-School – to create entrepreneurs.

Faculty need to make contributions to knowledge, consulting, teaching and training. As of today it seems that B-Schools are in the business of chasing training opportunities that are easy to capture rather than creating knowledge that is meaningful and a reflection of our existing context.

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