December 2017
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How to Create a Patient-Centric Healthcare System in India

 

Under a patient-centric system, individuals have the right to expect improved care as long as they educate themselves about health maintenance and wellness practices, change their behaviors to better manage their health

Under a patient-centric system, individuals have the right to expect improved care and wellness practices 

New Delhi: December 2, 2017

Throughout the developing world including India, healthcare systems are in crisis.  Whether healthcare is shaped by government policy, driven by the market or a combination of both, aging populations and skyrocketing costs are putting unprecedented financial and organizational pressure on state and private healthcare providers as well as payers. The result is often a decreasing level of care.

Patient-centric systems are evolving in which the patient’s well-being and the responsibility for his or her own good health are defining treatment and operational policies. This change is made  possible by advances in technology, but it is being driven by market forces  and societal desire to improve the health of a nation’s citizens, while reducing  healthcare costs.

Under a patient-centric system, individuals have the right to expect improved care as long as they educate  themselves about health maintenance and wellness practices, change their  behaviors to better manage their health, access medical records and  information, and contribute an appropriate share to the total cost of care. Under a patient-centric system, individuals have the right to expect improved care as long as they educate  themselves about health maintenance and wellness practices, change their  behaviors to better manage their health, access medical records and  information, and contribute an appropriate share to the total cost of care.

Patient empowerment, patient-centricity and the resulting need for coordinated healthcare delivery is an irreversible sea-change facing health care. Technology will be a backbone that must help facilitate (and even lead) this change. Quality measurement, evidence-based decision support, care coordination (with Primary Care Physicians as the central, valued center of this coordination) are all things that will (1) result in cost moderation, (2) improve outcomes, and (3) improve satisfaction.

 Key areas that healthcare IT organizations must focus on:

There has been great interest among the patient community to manage their own health data, somewhat similar to how they manage their finances.  The patient’s data needs to available and the patient needs to take responsibility.

·           Hospital and insurance providers need to work with IT organizations to create websites that are more interactive and have more robust call to action items. Most hospital websites lack the basic functionality of “Request an Appointment.”

·         CRM systems:  In India, the IT systems are so disparate and cumbersome that the operators have to look up for information on multiple systems to get the right information at the right time.

·         Medical Innovation: The next medical innovation is going to happen in an area that closely relates to new cures and evidence-based medicine. Big data can play a major role here. However, most healthcare organizations are stuck and not making much progress in this area. It’s time that this changes. editor@ictpost.com

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